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PBGC Blog: Retirement Matters

10 Ways to Pay...

  |   June 10, 2013

In the article, "10 Ways to Pay for Retirement," U.S. News & World Report lists the most common ways to pay for retirement.

  1. Social Security.
  2. A pension.
  3. Retirement accounts.
  4. Home equity.
  5. Stock market investments.
  6. Savings accounts.
  7. Annuities or insurance plans.
  8. Part-time work.
  9. An inheritance.
  10. Rent and royalties.

Pensions are a big part of how people prepare for retirement, along with working longer, saving more, and — as a last resort — tapping home equity. Read the full article.

‘What is a Pension?’

  |   April 17, 2013

PBGC protects pensions. So, what is a pension? To most people, a pension is a retirement arrangement in which your employer promises you a regular payment from the day you retire, for as long as you live. The amount of your pension usually depends on how long you worked for an employer and your salary with that employer. Ask a retiree, "What is a pension?" and they may say,

"A pension is the $400 per month I receive for my many years of service at Acme Widgets. My pension helps to supplement the $600 per month I receive from Social Security and my retirement savings."

Normally, employees must work for an employer for a certain time period before the benefits they have earned belong to them. After they have done so, they are considered "vested" in those benefits. Today, in some pension plans, you are fully vested after five years on the job. In others, it takes you seven years to become fully vested - but you become vested in increasing portions of your benefit starting at three years. If you've worked for more than one company long enough to become vested in multiple pension plans, you can receive more than one pension payment.

More...

There are a number of websites and online tools to help with retirement planning.  In particular, retirement calculators are one of the most useful tools in helping future retirees figure out how much to save for retirement. Although this tool, in its many variations, can be extremely helpful, very few actually provide detailed instructions on how best to use them. Fortunately, CBSNEWS.COM features Steve Vernon's tips on using retirement calculators:

  • Tip #1: What rate of return do you expect on your retirement savings?
  • Tip #2: When do you expect to retire?
  • Tip #3: How long will you live?
  • Tip #4: How much retirement income do you need?
  • Tip #5: Should you include Social Security benefits?

Read the CBSNEWS.COM full article:http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505146_162-57494187/5-tips-for-using-retirement-calculators/.

As Josh Gotbaum pointed out in a recent Newsday op-ed, Americans are living longer and need to prepare for longer retirements.

Social Security also has to get ready.

As reported by US News, here are some data points relevant to Social Security’s finances: More...